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Converting Your Anger To A Force For Good

Photo by jasonbolonski, Flickr

I’m currently mad at myself. I second-guessed myself twice this morning, and as a result I lost out on two opportunities with no immediate possibility for a similar chance emerging. Last week I found myself getting irate over being constantly interrupted. We all get angry now and then.

What makes you mad?

  • When traffic accidents or inclement weather increases your standard commute time?
  • When you have computer or network connection troubles before an important presentation?
  • When employees make decisions that run counter to your company’s mission or culture?
  • When customers make overly-dramatic or unfounded accusations or complaints?

When you get angry, how you deal with that frustration could be very important to your health as well as the success of your business.

A powerful force

There are times when anger is a positive force; it alerts you that something’s wrong, motivates you or reveals a need for change.  Anger is damaging when you continually bottle it up or act out in ways that are destructive to yourself or irrational towards others. The most important question that a logical adult must ask when dealing with anger is, “where does the root of this anger stem from?”

Bonus: Is the standard method I use for dealing with my anger, the most constructive/appropriate?

Understand Your Anger

Is the blame going to the right party?(It’s so easy to blame others instead of ourself) Is health or environmental factors contributing? Is the rage an outgrowth of another feeling like frustration, fear or embarrassment? If you need help zeroing in on where your anger is coming from, experts recommend journaling each instance to help sort out your thoughts from your feelings.

Question: What effect does my anger have on my business?

Express Yourself Constructively

If anger has resulted from another’s actions and needs to be addressed, take time to cool down before approaching him or her. Communication is very important to ensure a similar instance doesn’t occur again. Stay on topic to the issue at hand; don’t bring up past grievances or mistakes. The point is for you and others involved to grow, learn, and sympathize in order to avoid a repeated occurance.

Question: How can I achieve more effective communication?

Take Action

You’ll never be able to eliminate all the things that might upset you. External forces, circumstances beyond your control, and mechanical breakdowns are all a part of life. But with the things that are in your control, you should focus on eliminating your anger triggers, fixing the problems and finding constructive outlets. While that may be easier said than done, an honest examination of your life will highlight areas or instances that you can cut-out or reduce or even initiate to keep ire at bay.

Question: Since taking action, am I getting mad less frequently?

Find a use for your anger; don’t let it be a wasted emotion. But when it’s been properly dealt with, move on to happier and brighter things.

“For every minute you are angry you lose sixty seconds of happiness.”
Ralph Waldo Emerson

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About the Author

  • Brieanne Gerritsen

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