How Does Your Customer Service Speak For Your Company?

  • March 28th, 2013
  • Brieanne Gerritsen

How Does Your Customer Service Speak For Your Company?The way your employees treat your customers speaks volumes about your company.

— Positive: Your employees smile, speak respectfully, show empathy, respond appropriately to customer’s concerns, give timely answers to questions and requests, obey company policy, dress and behave in a manner that evokes a good feeling about your company.

— Negative: Your employees act impatient or ignore customers, evade work, project a sloppy or unprofessional appearance, gossip about other customers in front of current ones, respond with annoyance to interruptions, and appear unsympathetic to customer problems.

— Forgettable: Your employees were there to do their job and did it adequately so. They served customers as required, and completed the job as expected. The customer may or may not be willing to patronize your business again, because you left no impression with them.

I recently came across this story of positive customer service which inspired this post. A customer of a Chili’s Restaurant took the time to type out her experience and it’s been shared nearly 200,000 times and has over 800,000 likes, and this is just on the post that was shared with me. I’m sure more posts on other networks have been viewed and left impressions on thousands more people. For the price of an extra cheeseburger and a few moments of thoughtful consideration from a server and manager, this story is reaching far and wide and building a positive reputation in the minds of the public at large, not to mention to those parents of children with special needs, an issue which has received a significant amount of media attention lately.

I want to share the experience that my husband, 7 year old autistic sister and I had today at the Chili’s location in Midvale, UT. Arianna, my little sister, didn’t waste any time when our waitress, Lauren, greeted us at our table. Arianna promptly ordered her cheeseburger with pickles, french fries, and chocolate milk before Lauren could even take our drink order. Lauren smiled and told Arianna, “Okay! I’ll be right back with your chocolate milk!”.

When we got our food I was wondering why Arianna wouldn’t touch her cheeseburger, but was going to town on her french fries. I asked her, “Arianna are you going to eat your cheeseburger?” She calmly said, “No, I don’t want it.” Cheeseburgers, or ‘Krabby Patties’ as we sometimes call them, are her FAVORITE! So this behavior was VERY strange. So I asked her, “Why don’t you want it?”. She replied, “It’s broken. I need another one that’s fixed.” Then it dawned on me why she wasn’t eating it. It’s because it was cut in half. Being a child with autism, she has to have certain things in a particular order at all times. One slight change in her routine can change the course of the day instantly.

When Lauren came back to check on us, I asked if we could order another cheeseburger and just add it to our check. She had a concerned look on her face so I explained that Arianna has autism, and that in her mind, because the cheeseburger was cut in half, she thinks it’s broken and can’t eat it. I told Lauren I knew it sounded silly, but if we could just order an additional one, we will gladly pay for it because there was nothing wrong with the one that was originally brought out. Lauren was so sweet and just smiled and went along with Arianna, telling her “I brought you a broken cheeseburger?! You know what, I’ll have them cook you a new one!” I loved this because rather than just taking it from the table, she actually TOLD Arianna what she was doing. While this seems insignificant, by her telling Arianna what she was doing, we avoided a meltdown.

The manager, Bradley Cottermole, then came to our table, kneeled down, and said to Arianna, “I heard we gave you a broken cheeseburger! I am so sorry about that! We are making you a brand new one that isn’t broken, with pickles! I’ll bring you some french fries to munch on while you’re waiting, ok?”

A couple of minutes later, Lauren arrived back at our table with cheeseburger #2. Arianna said, “OH FANK YOU! You fixded my cheeseburger!” When Lauren walked away, Arianna just sat there for a second and looked at her new burger. She looked so deep in thought….just staring at it….then she let out a big ”OH I missed you!!” and started kissing the burger over and over again. I showed Lauren this picture and said, “I think we glorified the cheeseburger too much!” She busted up laughing, and asked if she could go show her manager. She came back a minute later and said she showed everyone in the back kitchen area too, and that it made them all laugh and smile.

I was so touched by this experience. Especially since I know people who have been asked to leave restaurants when their child with autism is being disruptive. I expected a few different things with this scenario based on past experiences, but I did NOT expect such kind and compassionate mannerisms from Lauren and Bradley. Everyone, from the hostess to the chef, played a role in what most people would think isn’t a big deal. But this entirely shaped how the rest of our day would go. I know…a cheeseburger cut in half literally could make or break our day. In this case thanks to the professionalism of the crew in Midvale, it made our day. And I’m sure Arianna brightened up at least one of the employees days with her silly little personality. Thank you.

When it comes to serving customers with specials needs or disabilities, do your employees know what to do? What you expect of them? By including a few extra paragraphs in your employee training manual, you may be able to increase a positive experience for your customers dealing with disabilities and avoid upsetting the sensitive nature of those with special needs?

It only takes a few seconds for a customer share a story about a positive or negative experience in relation to your company. The actions you take to train employees according to your expectations today can mean the difference to which side of the story is shared about your company tomorrow.

About the Author

  • Brieanne Gerritsen

Comments

  1. This post came up on my news feed as well. It caught my attention because it’s the Chili’s by my home that my family, my friends, and I love to go to because of this type service. This is an awesome story and deserves recognition!

    Too many times we have good experiences and don’t bother with telling anyone. Then we have one bad experience and we want to tell EVERYONE! It’s great that Chili’s is using their social media correctly and not just trying to fix the negative feedback but promoting positive feedback. Not many companies look for the positive because they are “too busy” with looking for negative blips on the radar called social media.